Author Topic: Obama Keeps Drinking Water Safe From Radiation-Raised Limits 10,000 Times Higher  (Read 1043 times)

Offline Snafu

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“Following Japan’s Fukushima meltdown in 2011, EPA’s claims that no radioactivity could reach the U.S. at levels of concern were contradicted by its own rainwater measurements showing contamination from Fukushima throughout the U.S. well above Safe Drinking Water Act limits. In reaction, EPA prepared new limits 1000s of times higher than even the Fukushima rainwater because ‘EPA experienced major difficulties conveying to the public that the detected levels…were not of immediate concern for public health.’”

http://www.naturalnews.com/2017-01-10-water-crisis-on-obamas-final-day-epa-plans-for-huge-spike-in-radiation-exposure-allowed-in-public-drinking-water.html

As one of its closing acts before leaving the stage, the Obama administration plans to relax EPA guidelines regarding maximum allowable radiation levels in the nation’s drinking water, increasing them to levels thousands of times above current legal limits.

A federal lawsuit filed by Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility (PEER) led to the release of documents confirming details of the planned “Protective Action Guides” (PAGs) to be implemented, which include the new radically higher maximum allowable radiation levels.

PEER has accused the EPA of jeopardizing public health in favor of public relations.

From a PEER press release dated December 22, 2016:

“Following Japan’s Fukushima meltdown in 2011, EPA’s claims that no radioactivity could reach the U.S. at levels of concern were contradicted by its own rainwater measurements showing contamination from Fukushima throughout the U.S. well above Safe Drinking Water Act limits. In reaction, EPA prepared new limits 1000s of times higher than even the Fukushima rainwater because ‘EPA experienced major difficulties conveying to the public that the detected levels…were not of immediate concern for public health.’”
EPA kept details of new guidelines a secret

Although the EPA released its proposed PAGs for public comment, it conveniently neglected to include “all but four of the 110 radionuclides covered, and refused to reveal how much they were above Safe Drinking Water Act limits.”

Only after the PEER lawsuit forced the EPA to release the pertinent documents did it become clear how much the levels were to be increased. Even so, more than 60,000 people had already left comments in opposition of the proposed guidelines on the agency’s website.

Current drinking water radiation limits are defined under the Safe Drinking Water Act, established in the 1970s.

The documents obtained by PEER revealed that the EPA plans to raise maximum allowable limits of iodine-131, cobalt-60 and calcium-45 to more than 10,000 times the levels allowed under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Others would be hundreds or thousands of times higher under the new guidelines.

The agency’s justification for withholding the new proposed limits from the public until after the proposal had been adopted was that it wanted to “avoid confusion.”

The EPA deliberately hid the details not only from the public, but also from some of its own staff, according to PEER:

“The documents also reveal that EPA’s radiation division even hid the new concentrations from other divisions of EPA that were critical of the proposal, requiring repeated efforts to get them to even be disclosed internally.”

Even the George W. Bush administration’s attempt to introduce higher limits – a plan that was ultimately withdrawn – was modest in comparison to the levels proposed under the Obama EPA.

On December 1, outgoing EPA administrator Gina McCarthy gave final approval to all of the proposed PAGs – except for the drinking water standards. It’s unclear at this point whether she will actually approve the water section before leaving office, or whether she will leave the issue to the next administration to deal with.
Voice your opposition (before it’s too late)

There appears to be a good chance McCarthy will approve the rest of the PAGs before the changing of the guard, and there is still time to make your opposition to the proposals known.

It’s important to understand that higher allowable radiation limits will take pressure off the nuclear and fracking industries as well, which may be the real motivation for the establishment of the new guidelines – with Fukushima merely serving as an excuse to do so.

“The Dr. Strangelove wing of EPA does not want this information shared with many of its own experts, let alone the public,” said PEER executive director Jeff Ruch. “This is a matter of public health that should be promulgated in broad daylight rather than slimed through in the witching hours of a departing administration.”



Offline Nym Net

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I heard about them increasing the 'safe levels' some yrs ago. I think Japan was first to do so. Jeremy Wade of River  Monsters was at Chernobyl not so long ago catching catfish.

I always find these independent orgs interesting when it comes to the most visible pollution. Guess they don't look up that much. Even Greenpeace won't hear of it yet claim to be all about everything environment. Kids are now being taught about all the new clouds and cartoons are full of lines in the sky.

Search Results
There were no search results for the search "Geoengineering". Please try using more general terms to get more results.  http://www.peer.org/search.html?peer_custom_search_field=Geoengineering&x=0&y=0&id=3406

http://www.youtube.com/v/JQY-_utYkUU

I'll see if he can repeat this test on current snowfall. Still not proof that this is from Fukushima. Why do we see a pristine inner reactor when the exterior is a disaster? Lots of oddities.

Offline Nym Net

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It's been 30 years since the Chernobyl disaster, a nuclear reactor meltdown caused by a dark mix of design flaws and human error.

 The event immediately killed dozens and scarred the lives of tens of thousands of people over the ensuing decades.

Chernobyl is still considered the worst nuclear accident in history — but it could have been much, much worse, if not for a "suicide squad" of three brave volunteers.

                                                                                                                           Build-up to a nightmare

In the early hours of April 26, 1986, a test gone awry caused two explosions that took out Chernobyl's Unit 4, killing two workers instantly and 29 more in the next four months. (The long-term death count is still growing, and all estimates are disputed among scientists, government officials, and international bodies.)

Together, the explosions released 400 times as much radiation than the bomb the US dropped on Hiroshima in 1945.

All fires were extinguished or contained within 6 hours, but few anticipated a second, more dangerous problem would soon appear. In early May, Unit 4's reactor core was still melting down.

Under the reactor was a huge pool of water — coolant for the power plant. The continuous nuclear reaction, traveling in a smoldering flow of molten radioactive metal, was approaching the water.

"If that happened it would have triggered a second steam explosion that would have done unimaginable damage and destroyed the entire power station, including the three other reactors," author Andrew Leatherbarrow wrote in an email to Tech Insider.

Leatherbarrow recently published a book, called "1:23:40: The Incredible True Story of the Chernobyl Nuclear Disaster," that recounts the catastrophe's history on its 30th anniversary.

By most estimates, such a blast may have wiped out half of Europe, leaving it uninhabitable for 500,000 years.

                                                                                                                     The Chernobyl 'suicide squad'

In order to prevent the steam explosion, workers needed to drain the pool underneath the reactor. But the basement had flooded, and the valves were underwater.

The most popular version of events then goes something like this: One soldier and two plant workers, all volunteers, bravely strapped on wetsuits and clamored into the radioactive water. Even though their lamp died and the crew was left in darkness, they successfully shut off the valves.

They knew the basement was highly radioactive, but officials promised that if they died, their families would be provided for. It was, indeed, very possibly a suicide mission.

By the time the team left the pool, this version of the story goes, they were already suffering the effects of acute radiation syndrome (ARS). All of them supposedly died within weeks. what, they don't know if these so=called heros of Europe died or not?

                                                                                                                             What really happened

 Leatherbarrow has spent five years researching the disaster. His book gives a slightly different, but no less heroic, version of events.

"The basement entry, while dangerous, wasn't quite as dramatic as modern myth would have you believe," Leatherbarrow said.

Firefighters had tried a couple of times to use specialized hoses to drain much of the basement. The three men were, according to Leatherbarrow, all plant workers — no soldiers — who happened to be on-shift when the firefighters' draining procedure stopped.

They weren't the first in the watery basement, either. Others had entered to measure the radiation levels, though Leatherbarrow said he could never discover who they were, how many had entered, or what their conclusions were.

"Some water remained after the firemen's draining mission, up to knee-height in most areas, but the route was passable," Leatherbarrow's account reads.

"The men entered the basement in wetsuits, radioactive water up to their knees, in a corridor stuffed with myriad pipes and valves," he continues, "it was like finding a needle in a haystack."

The men worried they wouldn't be able to find the valves.

"When the searchlight beam fell on a pipe, we were joyous," mechanical engineer Alexei Ananenko said in interview with the Soviet press, as quoted by Leatherbarrow. "The pipe led to the valves."

The men felt their way to the valve in the dark basement. "We heard a rush of water out of the tank," Ananenko went on, "and in a few more minutes we were being embraced by the guys."

Definitively, Leatherbarrow said, none of the men died of ARS. The shift supervisor died of a heart attack in 2005. (Leatherbarrow attributes this to a mix-up with an employee with the same surname who did succumb to ARS.)
                                                                                                                             
                                                                                                                               Where they are now

 As for the other two men, Leatherbarrow said one is still alive and working in the industry, but he hasn't released his name because of privacy concerns. Leatherbarrow said that he lost track of the third man, but that he was alive at least up until 2015.

Complicating this is the contradictory reports from English media and the Soviet government, which famously tried to downplay the disaster. In addition, Leatherbarrow said the best sources out there have yet to be translated from Russian — including the accounts of senior managers, state-run media reports, and a book by an engineer who's been blamed for the disaster, but insists he was scapegoated by the government.

Even so, Leatherbarrow added, these men risked their lives to save untold millions of lives during a disaster of unheard of magnitude.

"They still went into a pitch black, badly damaged basement beneath a molten reactor core that was slowly burning its way down to them," he said.

Like many of the workers in the hours, months, days, and even years after Chernobyl, their bravery led them to a situation that required unimaginable acts.

http://www.businessinsider.com/chernobyl-volunteers-divers-nuclear-mission-2016-4?IR=T


Defying radiation, elderly residents cling on in Chernobyl
April 18, 2016

]http://phys.org/news/2016-04-defying-elderly-residents-chernobyl.html[url]

Offline Snafu

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25 counts per minute below alert level? C'mon Dutch, you need to raise your limits.



Corrected link for "Defying radiation, elderly residents cling on in Chernobyl"

http://phys.org/news/2016-04-defying-elderly-residents-chernobyl.html

« Last Edit: January 12, 2017, 09:29:34 PM by Snafu »

Offline Nym Net

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Thanks for correction. Free-wheeling on laptop without mouse atm and not liking it.

Offline Snafu

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OK Nym, I see where you're going with this. All you leechers out there (Nym, Daisy, and I are seeders) have missed all the behind the scenes (PM) action going on here. This should give you an idea on what it's about and the side each of us has picked.

I've read about all the wildlife in the Chernobyl exclusion zone before, but I didn't know how many people continued to live there. While after 30 years that makes a compelling case for your side, there's many things different about Chernobyl. It's been covered in a heavy layer of concrete for most of that time and it's not pouring radiation into the open air and Pacific Ocean.

Just to demonstrate the difference, here's the 2 latest articles from ENENews.com.

January 12th 2017
http://enenews.com/massive-die-off-of-sea-creatures-from-california-to-alaska-animals-starving-as-food-chains-continue-to-collapse-mass-starvation-events-plague-west-coast-scientist-felt-like-i-was-doing-not

January 10th 2017
http://enenews.com/fukushima-radiation-contaminates-west-coast-fish-fears-the-countrys-food-chain-is-polluted-a-terrifying-discovery-scientist-it-appears-plume-has-spread-throughout-vast-area-from-alas

All the claims that ENENews.com is a fear mongering site could be true if it weren't for the fact that all the animals are dead. I would think, I don't know, that radiation probably kills the smallest animals first, like Plankton. Once that's gone, starvation begins for everything else.

Also, if you follow the above links, ENENews.com doesn't write articles, they link to MSM articles and videos. Bottom line, I don't think a clear case can be made, that the results from Chernobyl, can in any way be applied to Fukushima. But I'm willing to listen and actually I'm hoping you're right.


Offline Nym Net

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Fair point on the concrete poured on Chernobyl. I will be looking for this evidence :)

Animal and marine die off couldn't be from over-fishing by any chance? Japan has been whale hunting in our waters for as long as I can remember:

In 1976, the quota for Southern Hemisphere Bryde's whales was set to zero by the IWC. However, Japan proceeded to take 225 of them during the 76–77 season by issuing itself a permit to take whales for scientific research under Article VIII of the ICRW. Following this event, the IWC recommended all future applications of Article VIII be reviewed by the IWC scientific committee.[75]

The meat is actually used to feed school children:

The post-war recovery established whale meat as a nationwide food source for the first time. In 1947 whale meat made up over 50 percent of the meat consumed in Japan. The market significantly increased through commercial sale and public distribution. In 1954, the School Lunch Act also included whale meat in compulsory education (elementary and middle school) to improve the nutrition of Japanese children.

My cousin spent much time there during a relationship and said if anything caused widespread illness there it would be smoking. Smoking is allowed in restaurants, taxis, cinemas, anywhere where there is enough space to get your hand to your mouth. Not on trains lol

Archeological evidence in the form of whale remains discovered in burial mounds suggests that whales have been consumed in Japan since the Jōmon period (12,000 BC). Without the means to engage in active whaling, consumption at that time primarily stemmed from stranded whales.[14] Surviving Ainu folklore reveals a long history of whaling[14] and a spiritual association with whales.[15] The earliest records of hand thrown harpoons date back to the 12th century.[16]

wikipedia

http://www.youtube.com/v/LHBf_aRoh9g

Offline Snafu

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Animal and marine die off couldn't be from over-fishing by any chance?

Eh...... No. Although I have heard that those Japanese Whaling Boats that were caught, switched over to Plankton fishing using itsy bitsy Plankton hooks.

Offline Nym Net

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Ok, I'm pulling out the big guns now lol

On Animal Deaths and Human Anxieties

Wildlife die-offs are an ancient phenomenon. One fossil site in Chile revealed recurring mass marine-mammal deaths, most likely from toxic algae blooms, dating back at least nine million years. Aristotle, in his “Historia Animalium,” in the fourth century B.C., remarked on mass dolphin strandings as simply something that the animals were known to do “at times.” The earliest written record in American history, from 1542, by the Spanish explorer Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, appears to indicate that Native Americans on Tampa Bay, in Florida, understood fish die-offs—which still occur in the area today—as typical of certain seasons.


http://www.newyorker.com/tech/elements/on-animal-deaths-and-human-anxieties