Author Topic: China’s plan for global network of surveillance satellites  (Read 1629 times)

RougeCoyote

  • Guest
China’s plan for global network of surveillance satellites
« on: March 31, 2014, 08:07:44 AM »
China’s plan for global network of surveillance satellites

News.com.au  http://www.news.com.au/
March 31, 2014 12:31AM

Eyes in space... A satellite in orbit above the Earth. Picture: AP Source: AP



CHINA is considering a plan to cover the entire world with a network of surveillance satellites. 
 
If it went ahead the plan could see more than 50 observation satellites in orbit within two years, The South China Morning Post  reported. This would put the country’s satellite surveillance capabilities on a par, or greater than, the US.

The paper said support for the massive upscale was fuelled by China’s frustration over the search for the missing Malaysia Airlines flight 370.

After a three-week search satellites have been unable to locate for certain debris from the disappeared plane, which was carrying mainly Chinese passengers on a scheduled flight to Beijing.

Unidentified objects... Taken by a Thai satellite this image shows floating objects in the southern Indian Ocean. Experts have been unable to say if they belong to the missing Malaysian plane. Picture: AFP Source: AFP

“If we had a global monitoring network today, we wouldn’t be searching in the dark. We would have a much greater chance to find the plane and trace it to its final position,” Professor Chi Tianhe, a researcher at the Chinese Academy of Sciences’ Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth, told the paper.

There are currently about 1000 satellites in orbit above the planet, though most are only for communications. Of these around 150 are for observation, remote-sensing and spying, according to statistics from the US-based Union of Concerned Scientists.

China’s current satellite surveillance capabilities are a state secret, though most of them are thought to be carrying out surveillance over China and the surrounding region.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Read more from News.com.au at: http://www.news.com.au/technology/science/chinas-plan-for-global-network-of-surveillance-satellites-spurred-by-fruitless-search-for-missing-malaysia-airlines-flight-mh370/story-fnjwlcze-1226869302163

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

All articles, opinions and comments on the X22 Report site are used for the purpose of criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching or research and is NOT an infringement of copyright

Any video / article from our channel may or may not at any time contain in full or in part, a series or multiple series of derivative works which are LEGAL under FAIR USE LAW.

The "Fair Use" Provisions outlined in Title 17, Chapter 01 Article 107 of the US Copyright Law states the following:

Notwithstanding the provisions of sections 106 and 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work, INCLUDING SUCH USE BY REPRODUCTION IN COPIES or phone records or BY ANY OTHER MEANS specified by that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is NOT an infringement of copyright. In determining whether the use made of a work in any particular case is a fair use the factors to be considered shall include:

(1) the PURPOSE and CHARACTER of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for NON-PROFIT educational purposes;
(2) the NATURE of the copyrighted work;
(3) the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole; and
(4) THE EFFECT OF THE USE UPON THE POTENTIAL MARKET FOR OR VALUE OF THE COPYRIGHTED WORK.

The fact that a work is unpublished shall not itself bar a finding of fair use if such finding is made upon consideration of all the above factors.



Deeply

  • Guest
Re: China’s plan for global network of surveillance satellites
« Reply #1 on: March 31, 2014, 05:15:04 PM »
If it went ahead the plan could see more than 50 observation satellites in orbit within two years.

If it went ahead? Nobody builds and send 50+ satellites into orbit in a two year time-frame. This was decided upon and initiated a decade ago - minimum.