Author Topic: It aint just happening in Ohio  (Read 2393 times)

Offline Ellipses

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It aint just happening in Ohio
« on: September 22, 2015, 12:07:53 AM »
UK taxpayers could be left footing costs running into hundreds of millions of pounds if the Government does not step in to support a huge steel plant where production has been halted, a union has warned.

SSI has announced a "pause" in iron and steelmaking at its plant in Redcar, Teesside, as well as the mothballing of one of its coke ovens.

Roy Rickhuss, general secretary of the Community union, said SSI needed short-term and immediate assistance from the Government.

"The most important thing to do is to ensure that these industrial assets are protected and preserved until steelmaking can resume. If that means the Government has to step in and assist then so be it.

We know a song about this ;)



Offline Ellipses

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Re: It aint just happening in Ohio
« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2015, 04:48:34 AM »
Employment in the UK manufacturing sector fell for the first time in two and a half years at the end of a "lacklustre" September, according to a survey.

The closely watched CIPS/Markit purchasing managers' index (PMI) survey posted a reading of 51.5 last month - where 50 separates growth from contraction. This is down from a revised reading of 51.6 in August.

The report said September rounded off one of the weakest quarters of the past two years, as factory job numbers fell for the first time since April 2013.

It blamed the strong pound and weak export orders for the slowdown.

The last three months have also seen a downturn in orders from China, the world's second largest economy.

The survey said consumer goods producers - the sector's star performer over recent months - saw a contraction in new orders for the first time in almost three and a half years.

It added that intermediate goods firms - which make items for use in products finished by other companies - saw the heaviest job falls in the sector.

Offline Ellipses

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Re: It aint just happening in Ohio
« Reply #2 on: October 17, 2015, 08:39:04 AM »
Now two further large steel plants in the UK are facing likely closure (one in Yorkshire and one in Scotland) before the end of the year.

Indications by the Bank of England of a likely interest rate rise in early 2016 have of course served to push the value of sterling up even higher against (an already devalued) Yuan.  This further exacerbates the consequent over-pricing of British Steel against Chinese imports.

A further example, in my view, of problems now becoming intractable - as the west increasingly paints itself into an ever tightening corner?

Offline Ellipses

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Re: It aint just happening in Ohio
« Reply #3 on: December 18, 2015, 11:33:09 AM »
Tears have been shed at the UK's last remaining deep coal mine as miners worked their final shift, ending underground production in the UK.

The closure of Kellingley Colliery in North Yorkshire will mark the end of an era, writing the final chapter of deep coal mining history.

The 450 miners who work at the pit - known locally as the Big K - will receive severance packages at 12 weeks of average pay.

This afternoon, miners clocked off for the final time after the last coal mining shift at the colliery.

Neil Townend, 51, said: "There's a few lads shedding tears, just getting all emotional."

"It's the last 450 miners losing their jobs just before Christmas and of course it's the families, as well, and the whole community.

"This is the industry that's been at the heart of our communities here in the Yorkshire coalfield and has powered the industry of the whole nation for generations."


Mr Townend added: "It's a bit sad really. I've been here 30 years, I don't know what to expect now, got to get another job.

"Life goes on."

Miners streamed through the entrance to the mine after their final shift, carrying bags full of their belongings. They clocked off before leaving the colliery for the final time.

Many said they were heading straight to the pub to celebrate their last day and felt "very sad" about the closure and worried for the future of those not old enough to retire.

"We've lost an entire industry, we've lost a way of life. Communities have been devastated over the last 30 years and haven't recovered"

Wayne Chadburn, 46, who has worked in the mining industry for 27 years and at Kellingley for 12, said many of the miners were putting on a brave face.

He said: "There was a bit of joviality. I think it's all put on, to be honest - go out with a bang. I don't think it's hit everybody yet."

Owners UK Coal will oversee the run down of the pit before the site is redeveloped.

In 1945 there were almost 1,000 collieries employing up to a million miners, making the industry a powerhouse and major employer in communities across Britain.

Coal from Kellingley will now be exhibited at the National Coal Mining Museum in Wakefield.

"We will continue to educate and inspire future generations about the history of coal mining and will display the last tonne of coal as a lasting reminder of deep-coal mining in Britain."

New museum pieces - coming soon to a town near you

Offline Ellipses

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Re: It aint just happening in Ohio
« Reply #4 on: January 18, 2016, 11:33:14 AM »
A further 1350 job losses have today been announced at steel plants in the UK.

This has been put down to the UK plant simply being 'unable to compete with cheap Chinese imports'.

Guess that can gloss over a multitude of sins.

You thinking what I am thinking?  ;)

Offline Ellipses

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Re: It aint just happening in Ohio
« Reply #5 on: March 31, 2016, 05:53:10 AM »
David Cameron will chair a meeting in Downing Street later to discuss the crisis in the steel industry, amid growing fears of huge job losses in the sector.

The Government has been criticised for its response to a recent announcement that a UK steel conglomerate is shortly to sell  all assets, including the country's biggest steel plant at Port Talbot in south Wales.  Closure is highly likely in the event of a non-sale of the loss making plant.

Around 40,000 jobs could be lost if no buyer is found, according to an analysis by the Institute for Public Policy Research.

More 'quality' jobs going- which ain't coming back

Offline Ellipses

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Re: It aint just happening in Ohio
« Reply #6 on: June 08, 2016, 05:09:01 AM »
Good news here in the UK on the jobs front.

Domino Pizza have recently announced plans to create up to 10,000 jobs nationwide in the run up to the 2016 Euro Soccer tournament in France.

This is great.  Who needs heavy engineering, steel production, automotive and rail manufacture, mining, ship-building, avionics or high-tech when we have this? 

Good times lay ahead  ;D